Book Review: The Ten Thousand Doors of January

Book Title: The Ten Thousand Doors of January

Author: Alix E. Harrow

Ratings: 5/5 Stars

Series? No

Goodreads


Hi all, it’s been almost an entire year since I have updated this blog. 2019 was a whirlwind for me, I became a business owner, a first home owner, and moved into the suburbs for the first time in a decade. 2020 has been catastrophic for reasons you can all relate to, but there’s been some joy mixed in as well: I got engaged, we got our first pets – two adorable kitties named Magnus and Coco who I have plastered all over social media. All in all, I have not had the time to consistently read, let alone write reviews or make graphics. Slowly but surely, I am finding my feet again, and would like to reclaim this corner of the internet — especially as I have already paid for the domain name for the coming year.

The book that I wanted to write about today is one that lifted me out of my year-long reading rut and plummeted me straight back into the rabbit hole. The Ten Thousand Doors of January is filled with a yearning for other worlds, brimming with the power of written words and the enduring magic of stories. If there’s anything a life-long fantasy reader can relate to, it’s the ache for more and this book clearly resonated. As January uncovered long forgotten Doors, I rediscovered the joy of sinking myself into the pages of a book.

For me, this book ticked all of the boxes in terms of the tropes I love: stories as literal magic, doorways into other worlds, found families in every sense of the words, and a dash of two romances filled with longing. As a self-professed sucker for beautiful writing, this book had me hook, line, and sinker. The story alternated between January Scaller’s retelling of her encounters with Doors, and the narration from a mysterious book that altered the course of her life. As the book progressed, the two stories danced inexorably closer together, weaving a cohesive narrative that spans two lifetimes and countless adventures.

Aside from the magic aspects, the book also shone a direct light on the uglier parts of society – one that stubbornly held onto tradition, white aristocracy, and polite veneer. The exploration of January’s relationship with her foster father, Mr Locke, is an extension of this discussion. While the book treated the subject with nuance, it never shied from exposing the intrinsic harm and invisible violence of Mr Locke’s archaic world views.

The other relationships within this book were written with equal expertise, from January’s heartbreaking distance from her own father, to the mutual bond of trust she shares with her canine companion Bad, to her unlikely friendship with Jane. Harrow also writes about love and romance with the same magic that she pens adventures, whether it’s the destiny defying tale of Adelaide and her otherworldly boy – or the quiet flame that burns between January and a certain grocer’s son. Thanks to the impact of all these relationships, the book felt immersive despite its shorter page length.

If you’re looking for a fresh approach to portal fantasy that delivers timeless transportive magic, look no further than The Ten Thousand Doors of January! Have you read this book? Which other portal fantasy do you recommend (my other favourite is, of course, the Wayward Children series by Seanan Macguire).

11 thoughts on “Book Review: The Ten Thousand Doors of January

  1. Welcome back!!! I saw this post and was like, wait! When was the last time I saw a review from you, so of course I had to read it! Congratulations on your engagement and everything else! I’m glad you found a book to bring you back.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ah hello great to hear from you thanks for taking the time to bring us up to date and express your thoughts on this book. I will certainly look for the audiobook

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  3. Welcome back, Aentee! That is so many life changes, holy cow! I’m also emerging from a haitus (mine ended up being more like two years, oops) and it’s been so strange getting back into it. I’m excited to see some of your designs again. I love your Gilded Cage set; they’re still my phone background 🙂 This book sounds so good! My book club considered reading it for January (because of January, yes we’re cheesy) but not everyone could get a copy so it had to be delayed. Hopefully we’ll be able to get to it soon!

    Laura @BlueEyeBooks

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  4. That’s a lot of major things accomplished in 2019. Congrats on them all!
    Started on Ten Thousand Doors of January but didn’t get to finish before it was due back the library. I intend to revisit it.

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