Discussion: Is It Possible To Measure Blogging Success?

Discussion-Blogging-Success

Is It Possible To Measure Blogging Success?

Short answer? Yes, to a degree. BUT A successful blog is one with a happy/fulfilled owner.

Long answer? It’s complicated, and we shall delve into it below!

I think I will be amongst the majority if I admitted that my blogging started out as a hobby – and then evolved into a passion. However, with the more time I spend on it, the more I wonder how do I really know if my blog is progressing or growing? What even counts as a successful blog? Does it even matter? (Probably Not!). Here are my thoughts, I would love to hear yours at the end!

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Number of Followers/Subscribers

There are humans that would subscribe because they want to watch me ramble on a regular update? Fantastic! This count makes me happy as it means people care enough to be monitoring my blog or placing me on their feed. However, it’s important not to get worked up over the number because of a couple of factors:

  • It’s easily inflatable: e.g. via giveaway (which I adore :D) and follow-for-follow (which I am ambivalent about, however, I can understand the temptation – I’ve certainly fallen into its trap on occasions, especially on Instagram).
  • It’s hard to keep track of: what with bloglovin + email subscription list + GFC + WordPress… I can barely keep track of my own count.
  • This applies more to older blogs: how many of the people who initially subscribed are still active on the blogosphere? I have only been around for 3 months and even I have noticed the coming and going of my older followers (WOES, come back as I miss you!!)

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Comment/Interaction

This is my personal favourite as I adore chatting with you all and visiting your blog. I admit my heart swells a little with every comment, and I even get a little sad when a post does not do as well in engaging my regular commenters. However, I know 90% of the reason why I get so many comments is because I am a comment spammer myself! The ways that could influence activity are:

  • As mentioned above, how actively the blogger is engaging the community: more commenting generally means more comments. Good karma = awesome.
  • Whether what the blogger is posting is of ‘mainstream interest’ – I notice that my posts on popular books always get more interaction than my reviews of more obscure title. This completely makes sense, as I know how hard it is to talk about books I have NO CLUE on.
  • There are PLENTY of huge blogs that I stalk regularly, but don’t leave comments on because I am a bit intimidated. So the number of comments does not always equal wide reach.

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Pageviews

This actively shows how many people are reading your blog, where in the world they’re from, and which posts are the most popular. I find that this measure is also disproportionate to a lot of other stats as well:

  • My graphics design post is by far my biggest pageview earner, but I find that I get proportionately less comments. In fact, my Throne of Glass Wallpaper post pulled in 1200 pageviews out of a total of 7500 so far this month! Enough to make me entertain making more graphics – but laziness wins.
  • I can imagine posts such as Monthly/Weekly Book Release, Memes (especially for those who hosts them), giveaway posts etc… also having similar effect.
  • How regularly you post: a person who posts twice a week will get less views than a person who posts 6 times a week, given that they have the same audience reach.
  • Discrepancies between the system that is measuring your pageviews. Google Analytics seem to be the most reliable. I know when I use to have a shoujo manga blog on a different host aeons back, I got LOADS of views but I suspect majority of them were from bots because I never promoted my blog.

Verdict: so while pageview is a useful measure, it’s influenced by many factors. I actually care about this one the least.

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PUBLISHERS / ARCs / AUTHOR ‘FRIENDS’

This is an area I don’t want to go to deep in because that way drama lies. But I feel like this is an area where people actively get blogging envy. It does feel so good when you are put onto that coveted reviewer list, get whitelisted for a publisher, or are on first name basis with your favourite authors. But just remember ARCs are not everything. Authors are people and bloggers are people.  Plus:

  • International bloggers will find it a bit harder to get ARCs, despite their popularity.
  • Only you can determine your worth, not a publicity agent who only knows you through your blog stats!

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DON’T FORGET ABOUT OTHER PLATFORMS

While I mainly squat on my own blog, remember that other bloggers might find it more worthwhile to spend their time on other internet places. I know tons of bloggers who amass THOUSANDS of ardent fans on Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr, yet keep a lower profile on their blog because they like the other social sites better.  More power to them!

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Basically, all I learned from writing this post is that:

i) You should never judge a blog by its stats and
ii) At the end of the day, I just want to have fun and hang out with my book people!
iii) Numbers are the worst. There are no real measures. A successful blog is one that has a happy blogmistress/blogmaster!

But has quantifying your successes ever mattered to you? What do you think make a successful book blog? Please share!

119 thoughts on “Discussion: Is It Possible To Measure Blogging Success?

    1. I agree, happiness is key in whatever you do, especially if it involves something as precious as reading and writing ❤ And fgasdhfgasygf THANKS FOR STOPPING BY ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I mean most of us read and write with no expectation of being paid so it should _definitely_ pay off in happiness 🙂 (i know i’m getting pubbed now but i never expected to be so i still feel very close to that part of myself.)

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  1. I’m just imagining a “blogmistress” like some sort of strict matron looking over little blogglings and AHAHAHA. Anyhow, this was a really great post! I definitely track the first three stats myself — not a book review blogger, so I can’t really measure by ARCs — but comment count is the one I fixate myself over. Although it can be variable, from post to post, and also depending on whether I’ve had a comment spree recently.

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    1. AHAHAH I should have used a better word for it, but I do like that mental image 😉

      I would volunteer to be the disapproving blog mistress. The comment count and pageview can be so stressful, I have a little whine when I get less than usual – then I kick and get over myself XD

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  2. I love this discussion topic! I’ve also noticed myself caring less about the stats and wanting to engage and discuss with readers and other bloggers more. Being able to discuss recommendations and ships in the comments or on Twitter makes me the happiest now.

    And having been lucky enough to receive ARCs and eARCs, I don’t really consider it as a measure of success or anything like that anymore. Because there’s so much pressure involved in the whole reviewing process, there are definitely ‘successful’ bloggers who don’t want to receive ARCs.

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    1. We are quite lucky in Australia as the ARC thing is a lot less competitive and vicious here, I love seeing all my blogger friends get love from the publishers 😀 It’s a nice perk, but not everything, I actually find myself enjoying non-review books more as I put less pressure on myself to analyse them. I enjoy crazy twitter chats the most! I would be lying if I said I stopped caring about stats altogether, but I love the interaction the most.

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  3. So many valuable points here Aentee! It’s definitely important to be happy about how you’re blogging, and be proud on your own terms of how your blog is doing. ARC’s and review copies are privileges in themselves, but not essentials to have a successful blog. It definitely pays off to be a respectful, active member of the community who supports other bloggers as well 🙂

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    1. I agree so much with you there, Eugenia. ARCs are a nice perks but we definitely should not be expecting it of anyone! I think being involved in the community is the thing that’s most rewarding personally ❤

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  4. Oh boy, I love this post so much, Aentee. I must thank you for the tips you gave *waggles eyebrow*

    As for me, I haven’t fuss over how many page views I get on my own posts. Perhaps I’m still not feeling the blogging world. But I can see how obsessive some may get over the stats count. To be honest, I feel layback right now. But I know that will change once I become a much active blogger than I am now. Anyway, you have a big point there. Being happy in what you do is more than enough. At the end of the day, numbers are just numbers!

    Psst. I’m still amazed by how big your success is growing! ♡

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      1. I can assure you that your book is a best seller in the making, those TBR shelf stats will positively explode next year 😉 You can be laid back for as long as you like!

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    1. I AM NOT EVEN SURE HOW ANYTHING IN THIS POST WAS HELPFUL BUT THANK YOU! XD

      I envy your Zen, Evelyn, sometimes I look at my slowly creeping pageviews and can feel my blood pressure rising a little (which might be good for me as I have chronic hypotension lmao). I want to lay back and chill as well! But I need to be a far more efficient manager of time if I want to do that. I PROCRASTINATE ON TWITTER TOO MUCH XD

      Eeep thank you, it’s all thanks to lovely people like yourself *squishes* ❤

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  5. A successful blog is one that has a happy blogmistress/blogmaster! Yes yes yes!

    Of course I’m happy and a little proud of each follower I have and I love to see where the person who took a look at my blog is living and I love getting comments even more… but I wouldn’t measure my success with these things. I’d be bound to loose, because there is always someone who has more.
    As long as I’m happy with the things I’m doing on my blog, I’d say it is successful. Mostly because it is a hobby and I’m not making a living from it.

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    1. Though I say not to get caught up with the numbers, I still do a little mental backflip every single time I get a new follower so I 100% understand where you are coming from 🙂 I think for people who aren’t in the publishing industry or not trying to make connection for future published books, it’s very important to stay grounded and realise it’s a hobby – ergo you shouldn’t stress too much about it! Thanks for sharing your insight.

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  6. I totally agree that success can be quantitative, but I much prefer qualitative (whether I’m happy with my blog, making blogging friends, etc.) I admit that I probably get too worked up about the number comments, followers, views, etc. I get, but hopefully that will change as I continue blogging. (I also freak out since I don’t post nearly enough but that’s another story.) Lovely post, Aentee!

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    1. I agree, nowadays I try to remind myself that worrying about the numbers could mean I will appreciate my blog and my friends less – so I run to twitter and chat instead haha. I think you are following an awesome philosophy with it, Alexandra!

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  7. LOL I think I love the term blogmistress and hence will be using it often from now on. I love your topics Aentee! You never seem to run out of things to talk about 🙂 and yes, I agree, a successful blog is a happy blog!
    I joined this blog group on facebook a week ago and I saw the comment-and-comment-back thing that they were doing, I don’t feel quite comfortable with it since the topics of the blogs are wide-range and none of them were book bloggers. I just don’t know what to say on my comments on topics that’s not my interest XD
    I definitely agree with the things you mentioned, like page statistics and friends, and as someone who sucks in making acquaintances, I try to focus more on the books. Since I started blogging, I’ve finished more books in a month than I usually do! And it helps me become a more critical reader 🙂 Also, I discovered authors and novels that I won’t typically read but grew to love over time. Since my reason for starting a book blog is specifically to share my opinions and love for books somewhere, I think I’m satisfied with it for now. A lot of friends and people to talk to is ALWAYS a big plus, though. 😀
    Finally, regarding ARCs, I must admit I’m feeling a bit of pressure about it because it’s difficult for a blogger to get ARCs from publishers when you are a newbie or little known. I don’t even know how to get physical copies of books, . It’s like my new blogger wish: have books sent to me by mail, lol. But yeah, it’s not the only thing that matters 🙂

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    1. LMAO I am glad you like the term blogmistress because Kaja down below thinks it sounds dirty XD Which is totally not my intention at all. I just talk about the topics I feel crops up on twitter or in my own comment sections at the blog. This is the great things about having awesome followers and commenters like you guys!

      Yes, sometimes I stumble across a blog that’s got a completely different area of interest in terms of reading and I get kind of awkward commenting– but I tend to just not comment in those situation because people deserve better than a fake ‘nice review etc’ on their blog.

      We Australians are a bit lucky that the ARC market isn’t quite as competitive, so I don’t view ARC as a huge milestone -but it’s definitely lovely to get surprises in the mail box. I hope you’ll get your first physical review copy soon!

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      1. I agree with you about awkward commenting 😛 me too! although I think I’m ok with it not happening soon, I still got the library pile waiting for me lol. HAHA now that you mention it, blogmistress may come off slightly naughty, but it sounds so commanding too :p

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  8. I think before a blogger starts to measure their blogging success, they should define their purpose. Does blogging is your hobby or you want to do it professionally and make money of it? Who is your audience: book bloggers, people who love reading and don’t have blogs? Do you want to find friends so you can chat about books or you want to receive a lot of ARCs or you want to make money on advertisement or deals with booksellers or you want promote your book-related business (like cover-desigh or grafics or computer tips). If you know what you want it’s easier not to get frustrated. “A successful blog is one with a happy/fulfilled owner.” How much truth is in this, Aentee! For me book blogging is a hobby, so I do what I want. I follow blogs that are interesting and it doesn’t matter how many followers they have. Fantastic discussion post, as always!

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    1. I agree so much Ksenia, knowing your blogging purpose and who you want to write for is crucial! That’s a fantastic insight and I hope people are seeing this comment 🙂 I am glad to hear that you still firmly think of your blog as a hobby and don’t differentiate based on followers! Thanks for your awesome comment!

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  9. I think I measure a blog’s success on how happy the writer tends to be. XD When I see a blogger posting continually about a LOT of slumps and stuff….I always feel that they’re not really happy doing what they’re doing. WHICH IS SAD. D: I had to cut down on posting myself recently, but that’s not for slump sakes, I just want more time to be able to comment everywhere! And commenting around is the BEST way to get traffic to come to your blog. ABSOLUTELY AGREE WITH YOU THERE. I think stats and follower counts are also great too and I think we, as bloggers, should be allowed to be proud of them too. *nods* x)

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    1. That’s a great point, Cait, I can sense a lot about a blog’s status by the tone that the blogger is using in their post – and I vastly prefer visiting bloggers who are continually positive! I also want more time to comment, so I have been thinking of cutting back on my posting schedule myself 🙂 AND YES BE PROUD OF THE NUMBERS.

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  10. I try really hard not to think about it too much. I find that when I put a ton of pressure of my blog my enjoyment of it goes way down. In general I am trying very hard (and failing a lot!) to stop measuring my own success in terms of what the people around me are doing. It is a way of living that only makes me unhappy, and I don’t think it’s good for the work I want to produce either.

    I think that the best way to be proud of your progress – which we totally should be, by the way – is to think of it as just that: YOUR progress. It doesn’t matter if you have 50 followers and someone else has 500. You still earned those 50. At least this I what I try and tell myself in defence of my happiness in the blog world and in life in general.

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    1. I agree, whenever I get blog envy it gets really hard to enjoy the other aspects of blogging. When that happens I just log offline and go read a book instead haha.

      I think you’re absolutely right Lydia, the best thing to do is just to use your own measuring stick. Internal growth is good, but constant comparisons with others isn’t so much. Great insight, thanks for sharing it!

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  11. I love this post! and this topic! 😀

    you’re so right, it’s so hard to evaluate the success of a blog. It’s a success compared to what? your expectations? other blogs? how to even measure it?

    I would argue that you are super successful here though 😉

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    1. Thank you, I am so glad you enjoyed the post. I think success is all relative, there will always be someone with more followers and comments and what not – you can’t control that, you can only control to some degree how fulfilled you are with your own blog!

      AND EEP NO WAY XD I am but a newbie BS-ing her way through, I am just super lucky to have friends like you who visit my blog 🙂

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    1. Yes! Having friends on twitter or Gchat or WP that answers me when I need to have the next read sussed out is awesome! I heard someone said (I think Jeann?) that commenting is the lifeblood of book blogging, and it’s so true lmao.

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  12. I’d say a successful blog would be one that’s always growing. Not necessarily in numbers but in posts, updates, comments, etc. As long as your blog is always changing and updating I think that’s a win 🙂 Nice topic!

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    1. Growth is definitely an important measure internally, as long as there’s not too much comparison between myself VS other people I remain happy. Thanks ❤

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  13. This has been a thought on my mind a lot lately, especially since I’m reaching two years soon, and I don’t feel that I’ve accomplished what I would want with it. And I’m not having as much fun with it as I used to, and I think that all counts to non-success in my point of view. I definitely think there are ways to gauge blogging success, but I suppose the standards differ from person to person.

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    1. I would argue you are plenty successful for having so many loyal friends and commenters on your blog! I think it’s best to not compare yourself to other people, because some people might have posted daily for 2 years VS someone who posts once a week in 2 years would have very different experiences! Use your own measuring stick instead of measuring yourself against other people, that seems to make me most content!

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  14. Sometimes I can still get caught up in the stats, I’m still fairly new – so I find myself wondering how much my following has grown month to month. I personally, though, measure my success by my engagement with commenters on my blog and or authors and publishers through email and Twitter. I’ve made some really good connections and friends already, and I think that is the most important part ( besides sharing my love for books, of course). I also love hearing that my review, blurb, or any post makes someone want to read the book – I feel as if I have done a good job and it makes me proud.

    As for stats, I try not to focus on it too much. It’s so easy to cheat your way into having a large follower count, what with all the purchase accounts, follow-unfollow methods, and bribing. I think the success of a blog is the quality of the work, not just how many people are seeing it – that number is irrelevant, how many of them are actually people and not spammers or bots? It feels good to get a lot of page news, I’d be lying if I said it didn’t, but I’d much rather have engagement from a few individuals and build credibility over time that way.

    I hope you have an amazing day! This was a wonderful post, by the way ❤️

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  15. Great points, Aentee. I used to care about the stats and followers as well. But nowadays, and because my numbers seem to fluctuate at a consistent basis, I don’t find them reliable anymore. Interaction with other commenters/followers/bloggers is the stick by which I go by. More often, my commenters are the people whom I consider my friends. So, sometimes, I would have a constant number of comments at any given week. And I’m fine with that. I wish I have the time to go on a commenting spree on blogs I don’t follow or know, but life gets in the way of that, yanno?

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    1. I totally understand life getting in the way, I can only imagine it being 10x more busy for you because you have the little ones to take care of as well. I consider many of the people who comments on my blogposts my friends as well – so I don’t count comment as popularity -only that I am ridiculously lucky to have you all 😀

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  16. Seriously love this post, Aentee!! Everything about this is so relatable. Around April-July of this year I was really caught up in the stats when my blog started to grow in numbers, but now, even though it makes me smile and feel all warm inside to see a new comment or follower, I don’t really worry about it too much. Or I guess I’m not obsessed with it as I used to be. XD

    Aww, I totally know what you mean about how some posts are received differently. It makes a little sad if a post doesn’t seem to receive attention either, but that’s okay! There’s so many other factors to blogging, sometimes it depends on the time of the week you post as well. I’ve grown to learn that and WP insights has really helped me understand when my readers are more likely to see my posts. Plus, I feel like this is “school season,” all of us have been so busy with one commitment or another.

    I’ve really missed reading and commenting on your posts. Hope you’re doing well, Aentee! Have a lovely week! 😀

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    1. Yes, I definitely experienced that stats and followers high in my first couple of months as well, in fact it was ALL I really cared about. Nowadays, like you, though I am grateful and happy for every new person – I also am glad the blog’s growth isn’t as rapid anymore, as it means I have more time to connect to my existing readers.

      School has definitely taken loads of people away from blogging, I have missed you so much Summer, and all your lovely comment and positivity *hugs*

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  17. Being very new to the blogging scene I found this post very fascinating and informative, especially since I’m still fumbling about some days with all of the stats and everything else. Though, I must say that I find it quite fascinating to see what people take an interest in. Some times I think that a post will do really well, but it doesn’t and then the post that I wasn’t the biggest fan of gets tons of comments and likes. It’s baffling. It just goes to show that all you can do is have fun posting and enjoy it with the people who enjoy your posts. ^.^ Thanks for this post. Loved it!

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    1. I am so glad you found this helpful, I am relatively new to blogging myself so I am still trying to figure things out as well. I think the posts that are best received are ones loads of people can relate to, whether it be general discussion posts or review of a popular title. However, you should always post the content you want!

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  18. This post is everything. I use to look a lot at the statistics but now I don’t stress about it. I started my blog because I wanted to share my thoughts with fellow book readers and I enjoy the discussion more than anything.

    If there’s one thing I have noticed is that people seem to be less interested in reviews in comparison to the weekly features.

    At the end of the day I want to enjoy this and I enjoy the discussion, interaction and excitement I get when I’m writing a new post.

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    1. I am glad you have gotten pass stressing about stats ❤

      I also notice that my reviews do not seem to do nearly as well as my discussion or meme posts, but I think that's because people tend to stay away from reading book reviews if they haven't read the books? I also prefer commenting on discussion posts or feature posts myself because I have more to say beyond the 'oh I really want to read this book' haha!

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  19. Heyyyyy girl! I SOOOO AGREE that blog stats and all that YES, can be important but it’s not all I’m about anymore. (Usually I get sad sometimes when I don’t get as many views or comments as I want and lately I’ve just decided to lay back and be chill and just engage more in the community, talk to EVERYBODY, visit a ton of blogs and just make friends because the people (like you) that come and comment on my blog I count as friends so that makes it less stressful and I feel like I’m actually succeeding in the end instead of being all sad and pouting because my blog isn’t as successful as other blogs, YET.

    As always Aentee, AWESOME POST GIRL! ❤ xoxoxoxo

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    1. I am so happy to hear that you’ve found your shiny place in the blogging world – commenting and visiting blogs are the best – I VASTLY prefer it to sitting around writing reviews to be quite honest haha. Thank you so much for being so awesome to me, Keionda *hugs* ❤

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  20. “Blogmistress” sounds kind of dirty 😀

    This is such a cool post. Yeah, I get sad when I lose a follower or get turned down for an arc but then I think about how people I HAVE NEVER MET come by weekly and comment on my posts and how there are ACTUAL LIVING PEOPLE reading what started out as a personal way to ramble about books. That hits me from time to time and it’s still surreal.

    I am more likely to follow a blog with fewer followers (either on Twitter or on Bloglovin) – both because I feel that my comments will get answered if I comment there and because I, as a “small” blogger, appreciate followers and assume these other “small” bloggers will, too.

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    1. LMAO now that you mention, blogmistress does have a vaguely BDSM ring to it XD

      I know right, I sometimes get sad over the most petty things but then I look at my blogs and all of the insightful comments people left after reading my ramblings and I am boggled, The internet is an amazing place and I am glad to have a corner of it.

      Hehe small bloggers definitely need love, I am also more likely to comment on smaller blogs as I remember how it would make my day so much brighter 😀

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  21. I agree with so much of this! It’s okay to want to grow your reach (who doesn’t want to feel as if someone is reading what they write), but at the end of the day you have to be happy with your own blog and happy enough with the content that you’d have fun posting it even if your roommate is the only one who ever reads it. 🙂

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    1. Yes, as long as your purpose for blogging was to just share your thoughts with others, reaching even just a couple of people can be a success. Thanks for your insight, Briana ❤

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  22. It’s so hard, I think, as bloggers, sometimes, not to get influenced by stats, page views, followers, and everything that goes with it. Obviously, we all put a lot of followers, comments, page views, interactions, with a successful blog. That’s how I saw it at first, and how I still see it, because, well, if some blog has a great loads of followers, it means that people are enjoying it 🙂
    Even though, I have to say, what catches my attention the most, is comments and interactions. Even without knowing the number of followers a blog have, when they get many, many comments, and answers to them, and discuss a lot with others, I find that it’s very successful…because we’re all here to talk about books, aren’t we? 🙂
    There are days when I’m sad and disappointed that I don’t get more followers, but some other days, I’m reminded of the perfect people always coming back to comment on my posts and discuss with me about books. And this makes me happy. So I guess I consider myself pretty successful, because I’m happy in what I’m doing, no matter if I don’t have that many followers! 🙂
    Amazing discussion Aentee! 😀

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    1. I think numbers are still important to some degree and you should absolutely be proud of yours when they rise 😀 I agree with you in that I love the interactions the most, especially when it’s discussions that can engage and produce a lot of meaningful comments. I am also very lucky to have all of you can read my posts, so thank you so much for that ❤ I totally think you are successful, though! Thank you!!

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  23. I’m AMAZED buy how fast you’ve grown, Aentee! Congrats! I think your blog is great and I love your graphics. 🙂 That said, I agree – having comments is the best. I always love to interact with people and visit their blogs too. I’m not very active outside Twitter, GR and the blogosphere, though, haha. I don’t feel like I have enough time for more. :/

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    1. Thank you so much Vane, I feel so lucky whenever I look at this blog because I have managed to meet so many amazing friends including yourself! I really love commenting and interacting with everyone. I pretty much just live on here and Twitter though, my GR shelf is SO UNDERAPPRECIATED lmao. I need to actively check out that place more.

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  24. Great topic Aentee! I totally agree with you on everything! At the beginning, I used to envy other bloggers and I was always concerned about my stats and low followers but now I don’t care about numbers because I’ve realized they’ll only get in your way of happy blogging experience. I always comment on the posts that I like and would love to interact with other bloggers. I blog because it’s something that makes me happy.
    Happy Blogging! 😀

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    1. Thank you so much for always commenting on my blog, it’s wonderful people like you that makes this experience so amazing! I am glad that you have gotten over the difficult hurdle of blogger envy 🙂

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  25. I really liked reading this post.
    I’m going to be honest. I’ve been in the blogosphere almost a month and I’m really, really enjoying this experience. However, sometimes I have to remember myself that the world won’t know my blog in two days, that its hard work and maybe slow (or not) progress,but its a progress, a process. I’m afraid that one day I won’t have more ideas to post because now I have a lot but I know that is mostly because I’m new in this and I just want to do/post everything now so I have to calm down sometimes.
    Other thing I’m TOTALLY agree with you is in the ARC thing. I mean, I have recived a few and I love asking some I really want to read as I love reciving them. I love reviewing. But for me (that I live in Uruguay) I know its almost impossible to recive an ARC. Many people don’t know where my country is. What I want to say is, I love asking/reciving/reviewing ARCs but not always is that easy to get them and they don’t tell how good reviewer/blogger/anything you (or I ) are.
    Sorry for this loong comment 😀

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    1. Patience really is key when it comes to blogging, you are doing fantastic for one month – at my one month mark I don’t think ANYONE was reading my blog at all haha. Don’t worry the ideas will always come, I’ve worried about that in the past as well but you never really run out of things to chat about, ARCs are great when you get them, but you are absolutely right that we shouldn’t go measuring our worth on how many we get 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. idk anything about blogging success but I do agree that these are major factors but can also be influenced by the blogger just being more active! Success is really hard to measure because it’s so subjective 🙂 Personally, success for me is having at least 1 person out there to chat with about books haha that is literally all I need! I would love ARCs now and then but I’ve gotten used to the unlikeliness of that considering I’m living in the middle of the desert lol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. In that case you can always chat with me Ju *hugs* There is always eARCs even in the middle of the desert so I am hoping you are getting your fair share as you deserve ❤

      Like

  27. I really hate the term “more successful bloggers”. Like how do you even begin to describe that? I don’t think follower counts mean anything because people frequently have giveaways these days and you know that those generate a ton of new followings, but they aren’t “real” followers. I feel the same with ARCs. If you know how to kiss-ass to authors/publishers, you’re bound to get arcs so that’s definitely not a measure of success. I like what you had to say about comments. I’m a HUUUUGE fan of comments and even though I might not get as many, I have a loyal following that I have gotten to know over the years through interactions. Anyways, to me, if you’re a good honest blogger who seems to enjoy what they are doing, you’re successful in my book. 🙂
    Fantastic post, Aentee. Come write my posts for me! 😛

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I completely agree Nick, I think blogging success is a misnomer and totally elusive because at the end of it – it’s a hobby. So we are essentially competing about how happy we are in our free time?! That’s a little bit ridiculous haha. I am a giant fan of all the beautiful comments, especially from my friends, because I know it shows that they care for what I am currently reading or am up to! Thank you Nick *hugs*

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  28. Aentee, I absolutely adore this post! (Okay I feel like I say this about all your posts, but let’s be serious, your posts are amazeballs.)
    When I first started out this year, I was a total sucker for the stats and the numbers. I would tell myself that I wasn’t but I was actually constantly (more than once a day) checking my stats! But now, about eight months later, I can’t remember the last time I looked at my stats! As for follower count, is it weird that I get kind of scared of my blog follower count rising? The thought of having potentially over 500 followers scares me a little!! 😅
    But I think the best thing is the interaction. After all, we blog to express and talk about our feelings and interests with people who have similar tastes! I always get the most satisfaction out of seeing people comment on my blog and me commenting back!
    I also fee the sadness of seeing former bloggers you followed in the beginning going. It’s such a sad thing to see them slowly fade.. Yet new wonderful bloggers come along too!

    Gosh I love this post. Thank you for the wonderful topic Aentee! 😆❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I try not to look at my stats anymore since they plummet on the days I don’t post and it just gets me all depressed haha. I know right, having a high follower count makes me a bit nervous as well because I can’t be as casual or flippant as I usually am since more people are watching XD
      Yes the interaction is fantastic, especially with people like yourself who I can tell genuinely cares about the community and the bonds you foster. You are a ray or rainbow in my blogging world, awesome Josie ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Aw Aentee you’re a sweetheart! And I’ve definitely stopped looking at stats for the exact same reason.
        You are such a wonderful part of my blogging world too Aentee!

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  29. I completely agree! I blog because books are my passion and I love to share them with the world. It is easy to get caught up in numbers and comparing myself to other bloggers, but at the end of the day it makes me happy to do what I do. Thank you so much for the great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. There are times where I go look at my stats and wonder what else I can do to get more viewers. It’s almost an addiction… I know there are posts I could write that would specifically draw in more viewers. But then I sit back and realize that I don’t NEED these huge viewer numbers. For one thing, the books I read and review are in a niche market compared to the ones other people review. So I can’t compare my stats to other people’s, or I’ll get depressed. But I also look at how far I’ve come in the few months that I’ve been blogging, so I guess I need to measure my success based on the milestones I set, not against other blogs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love that you have stuck to your guns in terms of blogging niche and never felt the need to read different books to expand it. You will definitely find your audience soon! You have done so well during your first few months, you should 100% be proud of it!

      Liked by 1 person

  31. I adore this post! Because it is so, so true: it started as a hobby, but turned into SO much more. Now, here’s the part where I admit the controversial: I care about the stupid numbers. I don’t WANT to, but because there really IS no one measurement of success, I use the numbers to slowly drive myself insane.

    Like, I was a competitive swimmer for most of my life (high school, college, the works), and in swimming, it is so easy- there are touchpads, so no room even for human error- the time tells the story. Either your time drops, or it doesn’t. Either you touched the wall before the girl next to you, or you didn’t. Done and done. But with blogging… I don’t know! And every time the pageviews go down by a little, or someone unfollows, or I see everyone and their dog getting an ARC… I can’t help but internally yell at myself. This competition, for me, is just with ME- I guess that’s the good thing about only knowing your own numbers 😉 Like, I guess I COULD technically stalk everyone’s followers or something, but how creepy is that? Also, huge waste of time.

    The irony here is, when talking about ANYONE else’s blog, I would agree completely- being happy with what you post, interacting, having fun, that would define success. But for me? I could have ten million views and want ten million and one 😉 I can go a few days, even weeks, without obsessing but it always comes back around hahah.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. WAA SHANNON. Remind me to never get in your way haha. I am just kidding though, I love that you are so frank about your competitive spirit! I would love to stay that determined but I am honestly just LAZY at the end of the day and this post is just one giant excuse for why I am no longer trying to actively find followers like I did in my first 2 months blogging haha.

      Like

  32. Oo ARCs, yeah that’s a hard topic to talk about. I really wish it was the case that everyone didn’t care about their stats or numbers. I feel sad because I see that our hobby has become a competition. I kind of am just blogging for the fun of it, I honestly could care less about pageviews and followers, but I love it when I interact with people on Twitter. That has definitely been a HUGE plus with book blogging!

    Awesome post Aentee. Everyone should just do whatever they want hahah 😛

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yesss I agree, competing with yourself is TOTALLY OK in my book, it’s good to see your own blog grows. But fostering envy or resentment over ARCs or followers is awful and we don’t need that in the community. I love being able to talk to everyone about books and beyond ❤

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  33. This is definitely true! I used to worry about stats before, but I’ve stopped doing that because it’s just not worth it, and I don’t want my blog to be defined because of petty numbers. A successful blog is definitely that blog that resonates with happiness and contentment. They don’t have to have everything, they only need to be happy with themselves and how they’re progressing. I’ve been in this thing for almost three years and I’ve never been happier!

    Faye at The Social Potato

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am going to do as always and follow your advice Faye, because you are a part of three hugely successful blog so you MUST know what you are doing hehe. So glad to hear that you are happy with where you are in your blog life because you MUST NEVER LEAVE IT *clings*

      Like

  34. In the beginning, you do worry worry about stats and numbers. At least I did! But not anymore, now I just blog and have fun with it. What makes a successful blogger? Those who are genuine, share their honest thoughts and add to the community in a positive way. Do that and you’re gold 😀 Also, no reason to feel intimated and not comment on bigger blogs. From experience, I know you leave lovely comments and anyone would be lucky to receive one!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yeah I know it’s silly, I will definitely try and buckle up and approach those popular bloggers more. I mean, they are popular for a reason right? They must be nice??

      Like

  35. I read this on my phone earlier and loved everything you said!
    I really hate when bloggers use the term ‘popular’ or ‘successful’ bloggers, I don’t care if they are referring to themselves or someone else, it’s stupid. There will always be someone with more page views, followers, ARC’s, author friends, etc.
    Nick and I talk about this all the time, I think comments are the most important, but even so, not the best way to measure ‘success.’
    I prefer comments over everything, real comments from people that care about me and my blog and the books I’m reading and not just ‘nice review’ type of comments that are clearly looking for comment-backs. (is that a word?)
    I recently found out that you can buy bloglovin/twitter/instagram followers and facebook likes and I was shocked. I’ve always suspected a few people have done this (and not just book bloggers) and I can’t help but think…. WHY???
    I’d rather be stuck at 2k bloglovin followers forever and have a small and loyal following than all these thousands of empty followers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I completely agree with yours and Nick’s POV. Nowadays it’s so easy to cheat the system and inflate things like follower counts, I feel that it cheapens the meaning of it a little. However, I think a person who have built up their following like yourself through hard work and dedication still deserves to be proud of those numbers. And you definitely have a super successful blog that I aspire to 😉 2K is pretty damn amazing!

      Like

  36. I LOVE THIS POST! I used to be obsessed with the amount of page views I’d get or how many comments were on each post, but now I barely worry about it! Sure, I love getting comments and I do feel despondent when I’m really proud of a review/post I’ve written and I don’t get many comments but then I realise it doesn’t matter how many comments I’m getting, but that I’m sharing my love of reading with people and that’s all that matters, even if it doesn’t get many views, I’m doing what I love and that’s the important thing. I think people measure a blog’s success by how many comments they get, or how many arcs they receive but in a way we’re all successful, as we’re all sharing our love of books and reading with others, and isn’t that the sole purpose for book blogging? Very good post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Kyra! I can certainly feel your passion for books by reading your blog posts, so I think you run a fantastic blog! I am glad you have reached a happy place in your blogging life ❤

      Like

  37. Wonderful post!! I completely agree and I sometimes completely lose the part that makes me happy. That’s when the slumps occur and I go back to the drawing board. I have to ask myself- why am I doing this again? I typically look at what I’ve been doing and realize I’ve been doing more tours and less fun and inspired things.

    BTW, LOVE your blog! I’m so happy we met over on Twitter ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. EEEP THANK YOU You are one of my blogging goals so I am SO happy to hear you enjoyed reading this post and my blog. I will definitely keep reflecting on my blogging goals and try hard to stay inspired. I find my favourite posts to write are the ones where I write the review in a slightly different way than usual 😀 Or write discussions!

      Like

    1. Haha thank you?? My main ‘tips’, if you can call them that, are just to i) make an effort to leave a meaningful comment on blogs you visit and ii) post regularly. That’s honestly the only things I’ve strived to do haha, I did not set out with the intention of amassing a huge number of followers or pageviews XD

      Liked by 1 person

  38. this is such a wonderful post!! it reminds bloggers that it’s not always about the numbers and arcs. just remember why you started blogging in the first place! (which, hopefully, wasn’t because you wanted a large following and arcs. in that case, YOU’RE LAME.) 🙂 xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wise words Alex, I have not ever met anyone who blog for the intention of ARC or popularity (and if you are thinking to do it, don’t, it requires WAY too much work hahaha) If I ever met these people though, I would side eye the crap out of them.

      Like

  39. Great post Aentee. I honestly don’t care all that much about stats and followers anymore.

    I got a little bogged down about it at the start and it caused me stress so I stopped trying so hard. I’m just happy at this point to engage the followers I do have. I love getting likes on my posts too of course, I won’t lie about that 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree Nicola, engaging with the followers and regular commenters you have is so important, as maintaining a relationship is equally as important as establishing it through a follow.

      Liked by 1 person

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